Eight Reasons Your Nipples Are Itching

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Scratching in public can be very embarrassing, and of all the body parts, you do not want to be scratching your breasts or backside in public.

When it comes to having itchy skin around your breasts and nipples, some factors could cause it asides hot weather. However, most of the causes of itchy skin are harmless, but it pays to know what exactly is making your skin feel itchy so you can understand how to treat it.

Itching nipples

Below are eight possible reasons why you have itchy skin,  but if you’ve been scratching too much and you feel one of these reasons is not a likely cause, it is best that you see your gynaecologist.

1. You might have eczema

Eczema is a skin condition that can appear anywhere on your skin and it gets worse with environmental exposure. One peculiar thing about an eczema rash is that it has a specific look which is a small raised bump on your skin or red patch on your skin. However, a lot of people are used to having eczema on their face, hands, or other parts of the body, but it is very possible for an eczema rash to appear on your nipples or anywhere else on your breasts.

However, if eczema would attack your nipples, it will most possibly attack both at the same time.The good news is you can try to treat eczema on your own by avoiding harsh bath soaps and body creams. Making use of petroleum jelly will help the area heal faster, and there are many over the counter ointment that helps with such skin infection. However if you have tried to self-treat and it doesn’t work, do well to see your dermatologist immediately.

2. You may have psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common skin infection just like eczema, only that it is caused by an autoimmune disorder causes it. Psoriasis has an easy to spot look which is a usually red and scaly patch on the skin. Most times they appear on the knees and elbows, and they’re very itchy in nature. Furthermore, it is sporadic for it to appear on the breasts and nipples but there have been cases of such attack, and unlike eczema, you do not have to consider self-treating for this one. It is wise that you see your dermatologist for the right treatment.

3. You are using narcotics

It might not be an intentional use of narcotics or an addiction especially because there are many reasons why your doctor may want to prescribe a pain reliever that has appeared as one of its chemical content. While taking such medication might help you is severe headaches or bone pain the narcotics are a possible reason why you are scratching your body. According to Dr. Stephanie got some opiates can cause a release of histamine from some of your body cells which would then prompt you to experience itching.

If you suspect your body itching is as a result of the drug, you’re taking you can try having an oatmeal bath and keep your body moisturised throughout the day also you could ask your doctor if it’s OK for you to take antihistamine drugs. Something else you can consider is asking your doctor if it’s OK for you to change the medication you’re currently taking.

4. An insect bite

Insect bites can be very annoying regardless of where you have them however that is the least things you may likely think of when you start experiencing an itchy sensation on your nipple. Immediately you begin to experience the itching feeling check out for signs of insect bites like a little-swollen bump and redness around it also you might want to look out for bite marks like tiny holes as this would help you confirm your suspicion.

Once you have confirmed that what you have is an insect bite you can use any other instruments or any ointment to help with the itching sensation. Also, you should be very concerned if you are not sure what a particular insect has bitten you. If you feel it might be a poisonous insect, make sure to get medical assistance immediately.

5. Breast cancer radiation therapy

Undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer can cause a particular kind of skin inflammation known as dermatitis. Itching due to radiation therapy can start almost immediately or even months or years after the skin has been exposed to radiation. It was discovered that the skin irritation occurs because of the damage and scarring caused by the radiation beams that pass through your skin into deeper body tissues.

Doctor Stephanie Gore says “It usually presents as broken blood vessels and firmness of the skin; it may be painful, itchy, or have no associated symptoms at all.”  Just like some other form of skin irritation, moisturization is key to helping it heal faster, but it is better you see your doctor for better treatments.

6. You are expecting a baby

So a lot of people do not mention this as a symptom of pregnancy, but when you’re planning a baby, as the bump begins to show the possibilities of experiencing an itching nipple or itching in some areas of your breast is very high especially if it is your first pregnancy. The reason behind this is you begin to experience some bodily changes which include an increase in your breast size as it prepares for lactation.

This breast growth causes a stretch in your skin which sometimes leaves you with stretch marks that are usually itchy. To manage the situation, use body butters like shea butter and other ointments that will keep your skin moisturized and help reduce the itching

7. Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding a newborn, especially during the first period can leave your skin feeling dry and itchy. If you notice such dryness on your nipples, you can make use of a warm compress or ask your gynaecologist for other healthy options. One danger of having cracks on your nipples due to dryness is the possibility of getting infected with mastitis which can be a very painful experience thanks to irregular breastfeeding leading to clogged milk ducts.

8. Friction between your breasts and bra

Your nipples might be rubbing on your bra so much that it causes an itching sensation.  Such irritation can lead to dermatitis so if your bras are poorly fitting is best to get a new set that will be comfortable and not rub on your nipples.

This article is for educative purposes only and not to be substituted for professional medical advice.